In Review: Parks is "remarkable" in the title role of "The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs" at Santa Fe Opera

07.28.2017

 

"At the end of the world premiere of The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs, the audience roared its approval as if it had witnessed a blockbuster musical. . . Edward Parks makes a credible Jobs, visually as well as vocally. . . Santa Fe Opera has a hit on its hands."

-Financial Times


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"The cast was uniformly commendable for their acting as well as their singing. In the title role, baritone Edward Parks is on stage practically the whole time. He appears in roles like Figaro in The Barber of Seville and Valentin in Faust, so he is obviously able to sing in an expansive “operatic baritone” style. But he didn’t really do that here. He presented the part more intimately, as a lieder-singer might, with naturalness of style and exemplary diction. Subtle amplification underscored his performance, and indeed those of all the singers — a logical use of electronic technology in a score such as this."
-Santa Fe New Mexican

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"Edward Parks sang the marathon role (Jobs is in every scene) in a smooth, unflagging baritone." -Bachtrack.com


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"Edward Parks, who has a distinguished record of prizewinning success in international vocal competitions proved to be a plausible Jobs.Parks, who has likable lyric baritone, has the advantage of somewhat resembling Jobs as a thirty-something."

- Opera Warhorses


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"the adult Jobs (baritone Edward Parks, bearing a good resemblance to Jobs), takes his persona through a tour-de-force emotional journey from early promise to middle-life betrayals and cruelties, and finally to the emotional acceptance of his own death. On stage most of the time, Parks did not so much dominate as lead the ensemble. His stage bearing took on the self-contained, almost inscrutable manner of Jobs himself, far from an operatic stereotype." -LAOpus.com

 

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"The mercurial central character himself, brought elusively but expressively to life by baritone Edward Parks, holds center stage effortlessly, alternating at unpredictable intervals between gleeful young rebel and corporate tyrant, between spiritual seeker and flat-out bastard." -SFGate.com


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