Read these fine reviews for ELENI CALENOS as LoftOpera’s “Tosca”!!

03.18.2016

 

“Calenos, a young Greek-born soprano, had the best outing. Secure in pitch, rich in expressive detail, knifelike at the climaxes, she seemed ready for a much bigger stage.” -The New Yorker

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“The company performed in street clothes, in an unfussy production directed by Raymond Zilberberg with a game cast that put the emphasis on the art of singing–with a couple of pretty impressive performances that left the audience rapt. Most notable was soprano Eleni Calenos who embodied the petty jealousies of diva Floria Tosca without detracting from the opera itself. Her soaring voice and compelling acting provided thrills that left the audience cheering.” -BroadwayWorld.com

 

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“The real standout, however, was soprano Eleni Calenos’s searing performance as Tosca–passionate, mercurial, heart-on-the-sleeve, with all the necessary vocal range, stamina and fire.”

-Wall Street Journal

 

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“From the moment she sauntered into the church in a hat and sunglasses, the soprano Eleni Calenos proved compelling as the jealous heroine, her soaring voice heard to vivid effect in “Vissi d’arte.”” -The New York Times

 

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“When Calenos strutted into Zilberberg’s mise-en-scène, looking sophisticated in sunglasses and a sunhat, her presence kicked the proceedings into high gear, galvanized the space, and pricked the heart. Which is to say, her singing was some of the best I’ve heard in a long time—especially her middle register, which managed to be juicy, sonorous, and elegantly phrased all at once.”

-Parterre Box

 

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“In the title role, Eleni Calenos held the audience rapt from her first act entrance. A slim sword of a woman, she has a strong core in her voice, flexible and brightening under pressure without turning brittle or hard. A great outburst in the second act seemed to cut glass, drawing a shouted “Brava!” from the house. (No, it wasn’t me.) She produced dulcet tone for the Act I duet, white-hot rage in the confrontation with Scarpia and had enough gas left to almost burn down the warehouse with an incendiary Trionfal! sung in close cadence with the tenor.” -SuperConductor.com

 

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